Category Archives: Books and Authors

Buena Park Reads 2016

garden

Our sixth annual Buena Park Reads is underway. Every year we read one book together as a community. This year’s selection is Gail Tsukiyama’s The Samurai’s Garden, a poignant story set in 1930s Japan.

Stephen is a young Chinese painter who goes to his family’s summer home in a Japanese coastal village to recover from tuberculosis. There, he meets Matsu, a master gardener, and Sachi, a beautiful woman with leprosy, who change his life profoundly.

Be a part of this communal reading experience by reading this year’s selection (we have several copies at the library) and then joining us for one of our book discussion meetings in April.

Reading, Quilting, Storytelling

In conjunction with the fifth annual Buena Park Reads Together, the library is holding a community quilt workshop every Thursday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. during the month of April. During the workshop, participants create a quilt square that represents themselves, their family, and/or community.

The center square, beautifully embroidered by one of our very own librarians, of our community quilt

The center square, beautifully embroidered by one of our very own librarians, of our community quilt

Buena Park Reads Together is a program designed to get the entire community reading and discussing the same book.  This year’s selection is The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd.  The book was inspired by the true story of early nineteenth century abolitionist and suffragist Sarah Grimké.  Check out a copy of this unforgettable story, and join us as we create Buena Park’s story in a quilt.

wings

African American History Month: Books to Read

February is African American History Month. Here are a few titles that would be great reads to honor the heritage, spirit, and contributions of African Americans–not only this month but all year long.

For Adults and Young Adults

immortal  march  frederick  elizabetheyes  men  monster  purplequestlove  souls  native  warmthwhere  x  chains  caucasia


For Children

watsons  through  negro  martins  henrys  heartnothing  other  rosajazz  nightjohn  seeds

Honoring Dr. King

mlk jr

As Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday nears, why not pick up something from our collection to remember Dr. King and honor his legacy?

We have come a distance from Dr. King’s time, but we still have much work to do in the struggle against oppression, discrimination, and bigotry. As Dr. King wrote in his “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” we all are humans connected by our humanity:

“I am cognizant of the interrelatedness of all communities and states. I cannot sit idly by in Atlanta and not be concerned about what happens in Birmingham. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly affects all indirectly.”

We hope that the materials in our collection will help our community not only to remember a man who had a dream but also to be mobilized in the urgent work of making his dream the reality in which all peoples one day live.

Holiday Shopping Advice

Are you stressed out about your holiday shopping? Take heart. Helpful advice from Dave Barry to the rescue:

Here is a very efficient shopping method: divide the amount of money you have by the number of people on your gift list to get an average dollar amount per person. So if you have $160 and you want to buy gifts for 10 people, your average is $16 per person. Now find something that costs $16, and buy 10 of whatever it is. You’ll find many useful gifts in this price range; for example, you could get 10 family-sized bottles of vitamin B. Everyone, young and old alike, can use vitamin B, and your children are sure to shriek with delight when they find it under the tree.

And whatever you do, don’t get a man a new tie.

If you give [a man] a new tie, he will pretend to like it, but deep inside he will hate you. If you want to give a man something practical, consider tires. More than once, I would have gladly traded all the gifts I got for a new set of tires.

There you have it. All your holiday shopping woes solved. Vitamin B for all.

Dave Barry’s excellent advice above was taken from this hilarious book we have here at the library:

The Dreaded Feast: Writers on Enduring the Holidays

Check it out for more thoughts on the holiday season from writers including John Waters, Mark Twain, George Plimpton, Augusten Burroughs, and David Sedaris.

And Now You Know: Halloween History

How did we come to observe Halloween? There are several explanations for the existence of the holiday, but here is one plausibility.

Over 2,000 years ago, the Celts of Ireland and all over Europe considered a day corresponding to November 1 the beginning of their calendar year. On November 1, they held a feast called Samhain (pronounced Sah-ween). Samhain was the most important holiday of the Celtic year.

The Celts believed that ghosts, demons, fairies, and the souls of the dead mingled with the living  on Samhain. To protect themselves from unkind spirits, they left out sweets for the spirits to eat and disguised themselves in scary masks to trick the spirits.

The púca is a fairy of Irish folklore, able to change form and commonly taking the form of a yellow eyed horse.

The púca is a fairy of Irish folklore, able to change form and commonly taking the form of a yellow eyed horse.

As centuries passed, people from around the world added their own twist to Samhain. Catholic missionaries in Ireland promoted Samhain as a day to honor dead saints and called the day All Saints’ Day or All Hallows. The night before All Hallows became All Hallows Eve and, eventually, Halloween.

Halloween wasn’t popular in America until millions of Irish immigrants came to America in the 1800s, many of them fleeing Ireland’s potato famine. Americans began to dress in costumes and go from house to house asking for food or money, and by the late 1800s, there was a movement to make Halloween into a holiday about community rather than about ghosts, demons, and witchcraft. As a result, Halloween lost much of its supernatural and religious connotations by the turn of the century.

Cramped and overcrowded conditions on ships that sailed from Ireland to America caused so many deaths that the ships were called "coffin ships."

So many died in the cramped and overcrowded conditions of ships that sailed from Ireland to America that the ships were called “coffin ships.”

Today, Halloween is a huge consumer holiday in America. In 2012, Americans spent $8 billion on Halloween candy, costumes, and other related items. $8 billion! This year, the National Retail Federation predicts that the average American will spend $77.52 in honor of Halloween.

Want to learn more? Check out one of our excellent titles on the history of the holiday.

In-N-Out + The Fault in Our Stars

In_n_out_logoTeens and kids, if you love to read and if you love In-N-Out, then do your happy dance! From now until November 15, you can get free In-N-Out burgers for reading. AWESOME! Read on for the details.

Teens
Read a book, and then stop by the reference desk to pick up an index card. On the card, write the name of the book, its author, and why you recommend the book to others. When you turn the card in, you’ll receive an In-N-Out coupon AND a chance to win an AUTOGRAPHED copy of The Fault in Our Stars. You’ll receive an In-N-Out coupon for only your first book recommendation, but you can submit as many recommendations as you’d like for multiple chances to win the autographed copy of The Fault in our Stars.

tfios
Kids Ages 4-12
Stop by the children’s room to sign up. For every five books you read, you will receive an In-N-Out coupon. You can receive up to three In-N-Out coupons.

Get reading, and get eating! YUMMY!

Final Harry Potter Published This Day

hp covers
On this day seven years ago, July 21, 2007, the seventh and final installment of the Harry Potter series was published. I still remember reading Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows through the night and then feeling a sad weight in my stomach as I closed the back cover on Harry, Ron, Hermione, and the magical world they inhabited. O! The finality of it all!

Imagine my surprise when, a couple weeks ago, J.K. Rowling posted a new short story about Harry and the gang on the Pottermore website, shocking and elating millions of readers and eventually causing the site to crash. Haven’t read the story yet? You can read an excerpt here.

The story is sparking speculation that a new book or movie could be in the works. What do you think? Will we see a new book or movie? Do you want to see a new book or movie?

New E-books

Check out the newest additions to the library’s e-audiobook collection!  If you need more information about setting up your device, start at our digital library at: www.buenapark.lib.overdrive.com or contact the Reference Desk at: 714-826-4100 ext. 125

Sergeant Stubby  Unbreak my heart Michael Jordan  most dangerous animal of all  Lets just say  hiltons  Carsick  Aviators  10 percent happierThink like a freak

This Just In: Brand New Fiction!

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Warriors by Ted Bell

Warriors by Ted Bell

Under a Silent Moon by Elizabeth Haynes

Under a Silent Moon by Elizabeth Haynes

The Tyrant's Daughter by J.C. Carleson

The Tyrant’s Daughter by J.C. Carleson

Miss Julia's Marvelous Makeoverby Ann B. Ross

Miss Julia’s Marvelous Makeoverby Ann B. Ross

Love & Treasure by Ayelet Waldman

Love & Treasure by Ayelet Waldman

Death Come Quickly by Susan Wittig Albert

Death Come Quickly by Susan Wittig Albert

The Collector by Nora Roberts

The Collector by Nora Roberts

The Cold Nowhere by Brian Freeman

The Cold Nowhere by Brian Freeman